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[2012] Royal College of Nursing Fact Sheet on Non Medical Prescribing 390 0
List of Avoidable Frail and Elderly Conditions ICD-10 Codes 340 0
Risks involved in the implementation of Pharmacist-led prescription services? 157 0
What is the impact on patient outcomes by oral nutritional supplementation intervention? 144 3
NMP shown to be beneficial in Neonatal ICU 130 0
What can be done to reduce frequent flyers from A&E? 127 0
How to reduce unnecessary hospital attendances for young people with asthma? 111 0
Evidence of Primary care rapid response assessment of dysphagia in end of life 105 0
The Role of the Heart Failure Specialist Nurse(NMP) 104 2
Cash savings achieved by 24 hours Asthma service for young people’s? 100 0
Major challenges faced during the implementation of cardiology service? 95 1
What are the implementation details for musculoskeletal physiotherapy service? 90 2
Impact on patient safety by having musculoskeletal physiotherapy service 89 1
Specific ways of providing care? 88 2
What are the costs to implement early detection gastrointestinal service? 86 0

Recent Posts

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Poor nutritional status post stroke increases length of hospital stay and risk of complications and undernourishment on admission is an independent marker of poor outcome at six months post stroke. A large multicentre randomised controlled trial did not support the routine use of oral nutritional supplements in unselected patients with stroke. A meta-analysis combining data from the FOOD trial with data from the general elderly hospitalised population, however, did demonstrate a reduced mortality and fewer complications with the prescription of oral nutritional supplementation for patients identified as undernourished. This study highlighted the problem of patient compliance with supplementation over longer periods. There continues to be a lack of evidence on nutritional support such as food fortification and specific dietary advice.
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What is the impact on patient outcomes by oral nutritional supplementation intervention?
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In the period between 1 April 2012 and 31 March 2013, English NHS hospitals received nearly 5.3 million emergency admissions. A small number, fewer than 2 per cent of these (80,284), were excluded from the study due to invalid age or gender codes, or were for people resident outside England.

Of the remaining admissions, 1,044,407 (20.1%) were recorded as falling within one of the 27 conditions defined as ACS. The mean age of patients admitted as an emergency with an ACS condition was 55 years; 52 per cent were female. The number and rates of potentially avoidable emergency admission differed notably by age and gender.

The differences in rates of emergency admissions between age groups demonstrate the importance of standardising for age when comparing rates between areas. If an area has an unusually high proportion of older people,we would expect its rate of potentially avoidable admissions to be higher. Standardisation is required also when comparing rates of emergency admissions over time, as the population of England continues to get older. The age-standardised rate of admission for ACS conditions in 2012/13 was 1,613 per 100,000 people.

check out this link for more: http://www.nuffieldtrust.org.uk/sites/files/nuffield/publication/131010_qualitywatch_focus_preventable_admissions_0.pdf
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How many emergency admissions were ambulatory care sensitive in 2012/13?
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  • Home visits (plus telephone support) for heart failure patients; pregnant women with hypertension and/or diabetes, and mental health patients
  • Self-management, including practitioner review, for asthma and COPD patients
  • Specialist clinics for heart failure patients
  • Assertive Community Treatment for mental health patients
  • Managed Clinical Networks for patients with angina and diabetes
  • Tele-related health care for older people, and for people with heart failure, CHD, hypertension and diabetes
  • Smoking cessation to be offered to all patients with COPD
  • The step-wise approach to drug therapy for COPD (NICE Guidelines 2010)
  • Pulmonary rehabilitation for all patients with moderate to severe COPD
8
Interventions to reduce ACSC condition hospital admissions?
9
There were marked differences in the rates at which emergency ACS admissions occurred, both between the broad categories and between individual conditions. These differences are demonstrated in Figure 3.2 (see page 12), where each condition is represented by a box proportional in width to its admission rate. Boxes are arranged vertically by descending contribution to the total admission rate for each ACS type. For example, COPD has a relatively wide box because it had a high admission rate, and is placed near the top because it contributed 24 per cent of all chronic ACS admissions. Dehydration has a narrow box due to its much lower admission rate, and is placed near the bottom with a cluster of conditions that, when combined, contributed fewer than 10 per cent of all acute ACS admissions. The top row shows the admission rates for each of the three ACS categories.

In 2012/13, the vast majority (86 per cent) of ACS admissions were caused by acute and chronic conditions rather than the third category of ACS: other and vaccine-preventable conditions. Five individual ACS conditions accounted for more than half of all ACS admissions. These were urinary tract infection (UTI) and pyelonephritis (16 per cent of ACS admissions, 229 admissions per 100,000), COPD (12 per cent, 163 per 100,000), pneumonia (10 per cent, 141 per 100,000), ear, nose and throat (ENT) infections (9 per cent, 207 per 100,000) and convulsions and epilepsy (7 per cent, 142 per 100,000).

While 27 ACS conditions are specified under the most common definition, it is clear from Figure 3.2 that the majority of these conditions (15) contributed a combined total of fewer than 10 per cent of all ACS admissions. While many of the less common conditions might not seem sufficiently prevalent to be of interest, in some areas they will be of greater concern than others (for example, tuberculosis in London). It is notable that three out of the five most common conditions disproportionately affect older people. In total, 40 per cent of all emergency admissions were for patients aged 65 and over, and this proportion rose to 50 per cent when considering only the ACS admissions. However, COPD, pneumonia and
UTI/pyelonephritis had 75 per cent, 70 per cent and 63 per cent of their admissions for older people, respectively.

The other two of the most common conditions disproportionately affect children and young adults (ENT infections, and epilepsy and convulsions). However, when considering all ACS admissions, half were for patients aged 65 and over, whereas ust 19 per cent were for the under-20s. This confirms that potentially avoidable emergency admission is an issue that predominantly – but not exclusively – affects older people.

For more information visit: http://www.nuffieldtrust.org.uk/sites/files/nuffield/publication/131010_qualitywatch_focus_preventable_admissions_0.pdf
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Which conditions caused the most ACS admissions?
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Re: What is the impact on patient outcomes by oral nutritional supplementation intervention? by Chris
May 20, 2016, 11:00:57 am

Re: What is the impact on patient outcomes by oral nutritional supplementation intervention? by Laxmikant Tyagi
October 26, 2015, 07:59:18 am

Re: What is the impact on patient outcomes by oral nutritional supplementation intervention? by Laxmikant Tyagi
October 26, 2015, 07:57:42 am

What is the impact on patient outcomes by oral nutritional supplementation intervention? by Laxmikant Tyagi
October 26, 2015, 07:56:15 am

Re: How many emergency admissions were ambulatory care sensitive in 2012/13? by Sayyam
October 12, 2015, 01:16:59 pm

How many emergency admissions were ambulatory care sensitive in 2012/13? by Laxmikant Tyagi
October 12, 2015, 01:11:19 pm

Re: Interventions to reduce ACSC condition hospital admissions? by Laxmikant Tyagi
October 07, 2015, 08:51:10 am

Interventions to reduce ACSC condition hospital admissions? by Laxmikant Tyagi
October 07, 2015, 08:50:58 am

Re: Which conditions caused the most ACS admissions? by Harald Braun
October 07, 2015, 08:44:41 am

Which conditions caused the most ACS admissions? by Laxmikant Tyagi
October 07, 2015, 08:39:56 am

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